GENERAL PLANT INFORMATION:

Introducing aquatic plants into a pond is key to achieving and maintaining a healthy ecological balance and water clarity. Aquatic plants shade and cover the surface; help keep the water clean and clear; discourage the growth of algae; and provide shelter for fish. Both the roots and foliage of aquatic plants absorb minerals, nutrients and carbon dioxide from pond water. Finding a harmonious relationship between plants and fish is important.

Submerged plants are often referred to as water weeds. There is nothing pretty about these types of plants, but they are the hardest working of all plants in a pond. Their stems and leaves are submerged, and they are found in the deepest part of the pond. Crucial to the ecosystem, they oxygenate and filter water, absorb nutrients, reduce algae, serve as protection for baby fish, and provide shelter for spawning fish. Submerged plants are rapid spreaders and will eventually become invasive. Examples: cabomba (pictured), elodea, hornwort.

Floating pond plants simply float about on the water rather than being anchored in soil. Each plant has a well-developed root system that directly removes nutrients and minerals from the water. This in turn fertilizes the plants. Floaters also shade the water and deprive algae of necessary sunlight. Most floating plants are vigorous and rapid growers, and will require regular thinning out. Examples include water hyacinth, azolla, and water lettuce (pictured).

Marginal pond plants are grown on pond ledges. Only the roots and lower stems of these plants are in the water; their foliage is above the water. Marginal plants are almost always used for decoration; to add colour, and mostly help the pond blend into the surrounding garden. They must be containerized to keep their invasive roots in check. Examples include iris (pictured), canna, and taro.

Deep water pond plants are rooted in pots and tubs at the bottom of the pond. They are typically placed at 2 1/2-3ft unless elevated by blocks. Their roots and stems are submerged, and leaves and flowers float on the water. They provide valuable surface shade and help keep the water cool. Water lilies (pictured) and lotuses are the major components of this group.

NUMBER OF PLANTS:

To prevent overstocking the pond with plants, the following table may be useful as a guide:
 

PLANT

GROUP

SURFACE AREA IN SQ. FT.

15

25

40

60

90

120

150

Submerged

Floating

Marginal

Water Lilies

1

2

4

1

2

3

8

1

3

5

10

2

4

8

12

3

6

10

14

4

9

12

16

5

10

18

18

6

It is worth noting, that at no time should the surface of the pond be covered more than 70% by plants. Too much coverage lessens the amount of air exchange and traps poisonous carbon dioxide and other gases in the water.

PLANTING, RE-POTTING AND DIVIDING:

Plant, re-pot and divide aquatic plants from spring through summer. Plastic garden pots are ideal planting containers. The ideal planting medium is a clay/loam mix because the sediment is heavy and settles in the pond quickly, keeping tall and bulky plants stable.

Dividing marginal plants is not difficult - in almost all cases, you can simply remove the plant from its pot and divide it into two or three pieces. Each piece needs an equally good amount of root system and top growth.

PLANTING AND DIVIDING CHARGES

During the season bring your water lilies to us for free dividing.

There is a service charge for repotting and planting water lilies, lotus and other aquatic marginal plants as follows:

MARGINAL PLANT DIVIDING CHARGE - $4.99 per pot
LILY/LOTUS REPOTTING CHARGE - $10.00 per tub (tub is extra)
MARGINAL PLANT REPOTTING CHARGE - $6.99 per pot

Unfortunately, we cannot provide this service on weekends unless previously arranged with the Manager.

Would you like to do the dividing and repotting yourself? Please just ask us to show you how - we will gladly demonstrate.
 

INVASIVE AQUATIC SPECIES:

We must be aware of invasive aquatic species!

 

Eurasian Water-Milfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum)

European frog-bit (Hydrocharis morsus-ranae)

Fanwort (Cabomba caroliniana)

Flowering Rush (Butomus umbellatus)

Water Soldier (Stratiotes aloides)

Parrot Feather (Hyriophyllum aquaticum)

Yellow Iris (Iris pseudacorus)

Floating Heart (Nymphoides peltata)

Hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata)

European Water Chestnut (Trapa natans)

Help prevent the spread! When disposing of unwanted aquatic plants, invertebrates and fish:

. Never release aquatic plants, invertebrates or fish into natural waterways.
. Avoid compost disposal because many seeds can withstand drying and freezing.
. Return fish that outgrow ponds to local stores. In Ontario contact the Fish Rescue Program to find a home for unwanted fish at 1-800-563-7711.

Website:  http://www.invadingspecies.com/invaders/plants-aquatic/

 

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Web Administrator - Isa Webb